A Fiscal Plan for Puerto Rico Recovery

Faced with physical and economic devastation, Puerto Rico now has a once-in-a-generation chance to rebuild its infrastructure and economic foundation.  To succeed, decisive leadership is required on the island and in the US Congress.  A new, far-reaching plan must be set to restore economic growth.

On September 20th, Puerto Rico was hit by one of the most powerful hurricanes ever recorded. The damage was severe. Over 1000 people may have been killed, the electrical system was knocked out, and 45 days after the hurricane almost 60 percent of the island was still without electricity. Almost half a million housing units were destroyed by the storm, and over 80 percent of crops died. A large amount of the water supply is still not potable, and many schools have yet to reopen. Hospitals are also operating at a reduced capacity, while funding for government healthcare programs is running out. The Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College estimates that about 14 percent of the population will leave the island from 2017-2019.

Before the hurricane the Puerto Rican economy was already caught in a serious downward spiral, which included the negative feedback loop of increasing out-migration shrinking the economy and thus causing more to leave the island. The Puerto Rican economy stopped growing in 2005 and entered a “lost decade” of negative GDP growth, which was exacerbated by fiscal austerity. The poverty rate was a staggering 46 percent, and 58 percent for children (nearly three times the rate for the overall US); 11.8 percent of the workforce was unemployed; and population fell by nearly 10 percent between 2007 and 2016. The government coped with the fiscal effects of this downward spiral by issuing more debt.

By 2015 the government could not pay its debt but was not eligible for the same kind bankruptcy proceedings as US municipalities. In June 2016, the US Congress approved the Puerto Rico Oversight, Management and Stability Act (PROMESA).  The law did not provide any additional federal funding, whether in the form of Medicaid parity for Puerto Rico with the States, an earned income tax credit (“EITC”) or an expanded child-tax credit (“CTC”).   But it did create a bankruptcy-like procedure to restructure the islands debt in a court of law.  And it established a Financial Oversight and Management Board of Puerto Rico (FOMB) to oversee the island’s finances.  It approved a 10-year fiscal plan in March of 2017.

The pre-hurricane fiscal plan, proposed by the Governor and certified by the FOMB, did not provide for economic recovery.  As a result, the economy was not expected to return to growth for another decade, and probably substantially longer than that, because of a number of unrealistic assumptions. These assumptions included a failure to take into account the full multiplier effect of spending cuts and the loss of tax revenues as the economy declines; an underestimation of expected out-migration (even without the hurricane); and an over-optimistic view of how structural reforms, such as pension and other spending cuts, or downsizing the government labor force might stimulate growth, when the most likely effect is the opposite. Puerto Rico was thus facing one of the longest depressions in this hemisphere for at least the past century, before the hurricane damage.

In the aftermath of the hurricane Puerto Rico is developing a new fiscal plan. The FOMB has issued “core principles” to guide the post-hurricane fiscal plan.  These include “sufficient resources to ensure appropriate immediate emergency response and recovery effort in anticipation of federal funds, including provision of public safety, healthcare and education, in order to avoid increased outmigration;” [and a] capital expenditure plan [that] must provide the basis for a long-term economic recovery plan for Puerto Rico, focusing on increased and expedited support for rebuilding critical infrastructure such as energy, water, transportation and housing.”  

These are positive statements. The new plan for Puerto Rico must address the devastation caused by the hurricane and the problems that caused the prior deterioration of the economy. The plan must be fundamentally different than the previous one if Puerto Rico is to have a chance for recovery.  Puerto Rico’s leadership, the FOMB and the US Congress all have critical roles to play.

First, the new plan must allow for a return to sustained economic growth, which the previous plan did not. That means a clear rejection of austerity by the Governor and FOMB and a recognition by Congress of the need for a massive injection of funds for reconstruction, which would provide badly needed economic stimulus. The Governor of Puerto Rico estimates the island needs at least $94 billion to recover.  Moody’s estimates a similar amount. Although Puerto Rico is a hybrid political entity, it does not have control over monetary policy or its exchange rate, leaving fiscal policy as its only major macroeconomic instrument for economic recovery.  Later this month, Congress will take up a supplemental relief act for American regions destroyed by hurricanes and fires.   Puerto Rico’s reconstruction must be among the most urgent priorities for Congressional leadership and appropriators.

Second, the fiscal plan must deal realistically with the problem of Puerto Rico’s more than $70 billion unpayable debt, addressing both the $51.9 billion debt included in the fiscal plan and the more than $20 billion of public sector debt not included in the fiscal plan. If things went as hoped under the pre-hurricane fiscal plan, creditors would only have received $7.9 billion over the ten-year forecast period.  But there was no permanent, face value or interest reduction provided by the plan; it did not set forth a debt sustainability analysis or a comprehensive debt restructuring proposal. Not satisfied, some creditors took legal action to try and have the plan invalidated or the appointment of the FOMB declared unconstitutional.

The new fiscal plan must recognize that this debt is unpayable both in the short- and long-term, and propose steps to write down most or all of it, suspending any payments until the economy recovers. Without such a decisive step, the “debt overhang,” and legal actions by creditors (including some who bought at huge discounts to seek full payment) will exercise a drag on future investment and growth. Anything that diverts funds away from the people of Puerto Rico, and subtracts from economic growth must be rejected.

Third, Congress must finally recognize that Puerto Ricans are U.S. citizens and entitled to the same federal aid as those who live in the fifty states and the District of Columbia. The island receives only a fraction of the Medicaid support from the U.S. government that the poorest U.S. states receive and also less from Medicare. This federal policy has contributed billions of dollars to Puerto Rico’s debt. Puerto Rico needs the same level of support for Medicaid and Medicare as U.S. states.   The case is also strong for a federal EITC and an expanded CTC, both of which have enjoyed bipartisan support historically.

The new Puerto Rico fiscal plan must result in a viable economy for Puerto Rico. The alternative -- especially a return to austerity in any plan that fails to curtail the debt overhang -- would provoke further out-migration and accelerated economic decline, and prolong the current humanitarian crisis.

Signers

Daron Acemoglu , Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Alan A. Aja, Brooklyn College, City University of New York
Robert Blecker, American University
José Caraballo Cueto, University of Puerto Rico, Cayey
Hector Cordero-Guzman, Baruch College-City University of New York
William "Sandy" Darity, Jr., Duke university
Alberto Dávila. The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
Zadia M. Feliciano, Queens College, City University of New York
José M.Fernández, University of Louisville
Richard Freeman, Harvard University
Jason Furman, Harvard Kennedy School of Government
Jamie Galbraith, University of Texas, Austin
Martin Guzman, Columbia University
Darrick Hamilton, The New School
Simon Johnson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Thea Lee, Economic Policy Institute
José Alameda Lozado , University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez
Mario Marazzi Santiago, Puerto Rico Institute of Statistics
Marie T. Mora, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz, Columbia University
Dani Rodrik, Harvard Kennedy School of Government
Jeffrey Sachs, Columbia University
Gene Sperling, Former Director, National Economic Council
Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel Prize Recipient, Columbia University
Mark Weisbrot. Center for Economic and Policy Research
Antonio Weiss. Senior Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

* Note: The views expressed in this letter are those of the signatory and not necessarily those of the respective institutions and affiliations.

Photo Credits

Puerto Ricans march in DC by Jeff Malet
Upper Mina Falls by Mark Smith licensed under CC BY 2.0
Puerto Rico(Viejo San Juan) by Ricardo's Photography licensed under CC BY 2.0
306 & 1A by Ian D. Keating licensed under CC BY 2.0

Plan Fiscal Para La Recuperación De Puerto Rico

Enfrentándose a una tragedia física y económica, Puerto Rico tiene ahora una oportunidad ónica para reconstruir su infraestructura y su base económica. Para ello se requiere un liderazgo decisivo tanto en la isla como en el Congreso de los EEUU que restaure el crecimiento económico con un plan de largo alcance.

El 20 de septiembre, Puerto Rico fue víctima de uno de los huracanes más devastadores de su historia, dejando más de 1000 víctimas mortales y el sistema de electricidad destruido. 45 días después del huracán casi el 60 por ciento de la isla estaba todavía sin electricidad. La tormenta destruyó casi medio millón de viviendas y acabó con más del 80 por ciento de las cosechas. Una gran parte del suministro de agua todavía no es potable y muchas escuelas siguen cerradas. Los hospitales operan con servicios reducidos mientras que los fondos para los programas de sanidad póblica se están acabando. El Centro de Estudios Puertorriqueños de Hunter College estima que el 14 por ciento de la población abandonará la isla entre el 2017- 2019.

Antes del huracán, la economía puertorriqueña ya estaba sufriendo un serio declive, provocando un círculo vicioso en el que aumentaba la emigración al exterior, la emigración perjudicaba a su vez la economía y como consecuencia más gente abandonaba la isla. La economía de Puerto Rico dejó de crecer en el 2005 entrando en una "década perdida" de crecimiento negativo del PIB y agravándose por la austeridad scal. El nivel de pobreza alcanzaba un 46 por ciento y un 58 por ciento entre niños menores de edad (casi tres veces la tasa de todo EEUU); el desempleo aumentó a un 11.8 por ciento y la población disminuyó un 10 por ciento entre el 2010 y el 2017. El gobierno hizo frente a las consecuencias de esta caída creando más deuda.

En el 2015 el gobierno ya no pudo pagar su deuda pero no se le podía aplicar los mismos procedimientos de quiebra que se aplican a los estados o sus ciudades. En junio de 2016, el Congreso de los EEUU aprobó la "Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act" (conocida por sus siglas en inglés, PROMESA). Esta ley no aporta fondos federales adicionales como sucede en el resto de los estados, ni con Medicare, ni con el crédito por trabajo ("EITC") o el crédito por hijos dependientes ("CTC"). Pero creó una especie de procedimiento de quiebra para reestructurar la deuda de la isla en un tribunal de justicia y también estableció una junta llamada "Financial Oversight and Management Board" (FOMB) para dirigir las nanzas del país. Esa junta aprobó un plan scal a diez años en marzo del 2017.

Este plan scal que el Gobernador propuso y el FOMB con rmó antes del huracán, no preveía la reforma contributiva federal. Como consecuencia, no se esperaba que la economía volviera a crecer hasta después de diez años y probablemente más tarde aón, dado un nómero de suposiciones irrealistas. Estas suposiciones no tomaron en cuenta los móltiples efectos de recortes en los gastos de consumo o la pérdida de recaudos contributivos por el declive económico; subestimaron la posible emigración(incluso antes del huracán); y tuvieron una visión demasiado optimista de cómo incidirían las reformas estructurales como los recortes a las pensiones y otros gastos, o cómo disminuyendo el nómero de trabajadores del gobierno podrían simular crecimiento cuando el efecto más probable es el contrario. Antes de la llegada del huracán, Puerto Rico ya se enfrentaba a la depresión económica más extensa del hemisferio occidental en lo que va de siglo.

Después del huracán, Puerto Rico está elaborando un nuevo plan scal y el FOMB ha presentado unos "principios básicos" para guiarlo. Éstos incluyen "fondos su cientes para asegurar una respuesta efectiva a la emergencia inmediata y dar paso a esfuerzos de recuperación que aón esperan fondos federales, incluyendo asignaciones para seguridad póblica, sanidad y educación, con el n de evitar un aumento de la emigración". El plan de mejoras capitales debe sentar las bases para un plan de recuperación económica a largo plazo, enfocándose en aumentar y acelerar el apoyo para reconstruir la infraestructura que está en estado crítico como la energía, el agua, el transporte y la vivienda.

Estas declaraciones son positivas. El plan nuevo para Puerto Rico debe contemplar tanto la devastación causada por el huracán como los problemas que causaron el histórico declive de la economía. El plan debe ser diferente al anterior si queremos que Puerto Rico tenga una posibilidad de recuperación y los líderes de la isla, el FOMB y el Congreso de los EEUU, todos tienen papeles claves que jugar.

Primero, el plan debe generar crecimiento para alcanzar una economía sostenible, que el anterior no hacía. Eso signi ca abandonar las políticas de austeridad adoptadas por parte el Gobernador y el FOMB. El Congreso debe reconocer la necesidad masiva de fondos federales para la recuperación, los cuales contribuirían enormemente al estímulo que le urge a la economía. El Gobernador de Puerto Rico estima que la isla necesita por lo menos $94 mil millones para su recuperación y Moody's estima una cantidad similar. Puerto Rico no tiene control sobre su política monetaria, dejando solo la política scal como instrumento macroeconómico para la recuperación de su economía. A nal de mes, el Congreso creará un suplemento de ayudas para los estados y territorios devastados por huracanes y fuegos, y la reconstrucción de Puerto Rico debe estar entre las prioridades más urgentes para los líderes del Congreso.

Segundo, el plan scal debe tratar de forma realista los más de $70 mil millones que Puerto Rico tiene de deuda, abarcando tanto los $51.9 mil millones de deuda incluida en el plan scal como los más de $20 mil millones del sector póblico no incluidos en dicho plan. Si las cosas fueran como se anticipaba bajo el plan scal previo al huracán, los acreedores de esa deuda solo habrían recibido $7.9 mil millones en los diez años planeados. Pero en este plan original no había permanencia, valor predecible o reducción del interés; ni incluía un análisis de sostenibilidad de la deuda o una propuesta integral de reestructuración de deuda. Como consecuencia, algunos acreedores han tomado acciones legales para invalidar el plan o declarar al FOMB inconstitucional. El nuevo plan scal debe reconocer que no es posible pagar esta deuda ni a corto ni a largo plazo, y debe proponer pasos para segregar casi toda la deuda, suspendiendo pagos hasta que la economía se recupere. Sin estos pasos, el sobreendeudamiento y las acciones legales de los acreedores (incluyendo algunos que han ofrecido enormes descuentos de principal para asegurar el repago) imposibilitarán futuras inversiones y crecimiento económico. Todo aquello que desvíe fondos de la gente de Puerto Rico le resta al crecimiento económico y debe ser rechazado.

Tercero, el Congreso nalmente debe reconocer que los puertorriqueños son ciudadanos americanos con los mismos derechos a ayuda federal que aquellos que viven en los 50 estados y en el Distrito de Columbia. La isla recibe del gobierno americano solo una parte del apoyo de Medicaid que los estados más pobres de EEUU reciben y lo mismo sucede con Medicare. Esta política federal ha provocado miles de millones de dólares en deuda para Puerto Rico cuando lo que necesita es el mismo nivel de apoyo que tienen los estados bajo los programas de Medicaid y Medicare. El caso es también aplicable para el EITC federal y una expansión del CTC, los cuales han contado históricamente con el apoyo de ambos partidos.

El plan scal de Puerto Rico debe tener como resultado una economía viable. La alternativa - especialmente una austeridad scal que no incluya la reducción del endeudamiento póblico – provocaría mayor emigración de la población y aceleraría el declive económico, prolongando la actual crisis humanitaria.

Signers

Daron Acemoglu , Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Alan A. Aja, Brooklyn College, City University of New York
Robert Blecker, American University
José Caraballo Cueto, University of Puerto Rico, Cayey
Hector Cordero-Guzman, Baruch College-City University of New York
William "Sandy" Darity, Jr., Duke university
Alberto Dávila. The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
Zadia M. Feliciano, Queens College, City University of New York
José M.Fernández, University of Louisville
Richard Freeman, Harvard University
Jason Furman, Harvard Kennedy School of Government
Jamie Galbraith, University of Texas, Austin
Martin Guzman, Columbia University
Darrick Hamilton, The New School
Simon Johnson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Thea Lee, Economic Policy Institute
José Alameda Lozado , University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez
Mario Marazzi Santiago, Puerto Rico Institute of Statistics
Marie T. Mora, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz, Columbia University
Dani Rodrik, Harvard Kennedy School of Government
Jeffrey Sachs, Columbia University
Gene Sperling, Former Director, National Economic Council
Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel Prize Recipient, Columbia University
Mark Weisbrot. Center for Economic and Policy Research
Antonio Weiss. Senior Fellow, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

* NOTA: Las opiniones expresadas en esta carta son las del signatario y no necesariamente las de las respectivas instituciones y a liaciones.

Photo Credits

Los puertorriqueños marchan en DC por Jeff Malet
Upper Mina Falls de Mark Smith con licencia de CC BY 2.0
Puerto Rico(Viejo San Juan) de Ricardo's Photography con licencia de CC BY 2.0
306 & 1A de Ian D. Keating licensed undercon licencia de CC BY 2.0 é é